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  • Have a Sheltie that is over weight. Looking for advice on a proper diet to bring her weight down to a reasonable weight. She is a picky eater and wife has been making food available all day. Know this is not productive for weight loss. Will feed twice daily.

    Thanks in advance for the help,
    Chris
  • You can use a commercial or HMD diet for weight loss ... depends on your choice and dog's diet history. An overweight "picky" dog ususally means too much food is available too often.
  • What is the best diet for a small diabetic dog? Two vets have put us on W/M prescription diet, but this food contain a large amount of corn, in addition to meat by-products. I had one dog almost die (ketoacidosis).after being put on this diet. I have now rescued a diabetic shih-poo, 16 pounds, and have put her on Fromm dog food, a duck and sweet potato formula and sometime the fish and potato formula. The one diabetic dog died at 13 years, but not complications from the diabetes. This formual was suggested by a holistic veterinarian in Flowood, MS. Any suggestions?
  • Most DM dogs do well on a combination of insoluble and soluble fibers, but each is different so there is no one best diet for a canine diabetic. There is no W/M diet to my knowledge. I think you may mean the Hill's w/d which does contain WHOLE corn which does contain fiber ...... anyway each diabetic dog has to be managed individually.  For many dogs w/d works very well in experience but not for every diabetic dog.  Good thing there are many other excellent product choices for diabetics.
  • My Norwegian elkhound/German Shepherd mix had a cruciate reconstruction a couple of years ago and did well for a while. She has been packing on the pounds and has started limping a lot lately. My vet put her on Hill's canine metabolic advanced weight 3 or 4 weeks ago. My dog has lost some weight, gotten more energy and never limps. So far, so good. However, when I mentioned this to the pet store owner I buy treats from, she flipped out, told me that Hill's food is horrible, full of non-nutritional cellulose and fibers and the vets recommend it purely in order to make their profit. She said I should be buying Fromm's dog food, that she herself makes very little profit on it. As you can imagine, I am now very confused. I hesitate to approach my vet since the pet store owner accused her of making a harmful recommendation based on profit. What is your take on this matter?
  • In my experience, pet store people/owners have a product to sell and think nothing of bad mouthing any vet that does not conform to their rhetoric and does not help them sell the products they carry. Personally, I find most pet stores owner not only nutritionally ignorant, pet food industry unaware but dangerous for those pets with a medical condition. Pet shop recommendations for healthy pets are generally harmless but only because the healthy dog can survive under a wide variation of nutrient profiles.
     
    Anyway …. Weight control is key to managing your dog’s pain … I think you get that. The canine DNA research data from the Metabolic Diet is very interesting in terms of inducing weight loss and (most importantly) managing the appetite - a double advanatage. A hungry dog kills any weight loss plan. Bottom line ….. what is your dog telling you about the metabolic diet?

  • Is there actual scientific research that you know of that supports the use of glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate products (such as Cosequin DS) for dogs with mobility issues?

    I've read in a book and on another website that the research shows it works in-vitro but does nothing in a real live animal. Is this true? I'm asking this because I was having issues with my dog limping on his left front leg for a few moments upon rising.I had taken him to the vet and the vet said that his left elbow was a tad thicker than his right elbow, but I believe the x-ray was okay. He was diagnosed with mild arthritis in that left elbow based upon his symptoms and the slightly thicker left elbow upon palpation. He's been on Cosequin DS, Allerderm EFA-Caps HP, Science Diet Healthy Mobility dog food, and had restricted activity (leash walks only) for awhile, and the symptoms went away. He now runs around the large, fenced yard and plays fetch on a daily basis with no more symptoms. (PS - he was NEVER on pain medication.) I need to know if I should buy another bottle of Cosequin DS when this bottle is empty, which will be soon. I'll be retiring soon, and won't have the same income. As we know, Cosequin DS isn't cheap, but if there is real scientific evidence that it actually works, I will continue with it because I love my dog. I know that it appears to have worked, but I don't really know if he improved because of his period of restricted activity, the Cosequin DS, the EFA-Caps, the Science Diet Healthy Mobility, or just plain old mother nature and the element of time!
  • Yes there are several and the first one used the Cosequin formulation: 
    1. Effects of an orally administered mixture of chondroitin sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride and manganese ascorbate on synovial fluid chondroitin sulfate 3B3 and 7D4 epitope in a canine cruciate ligament transection model of osteoarthris by Johnson, K.A; Hulse, D.A; Hart, R.C; Kochevar, D; Chu, Q  Osteoarthritis and Cartilage, ISSN 1063-4584, 2001, Volume 9, Issue 1, pp. 14 - 21 
    2. Effect of glucosamine combined with omega-3 fatty acids on the development of canine experimental osteoarthritis by Frost-Christensen, LN; Mastbergen, SC; Garssen, J; Hartog, A; Hazewinkel, HA; Lafeber, FP; ARTHRITIS AND RHEUMATISM, ISSN 0004-3591, 09/2006, Volume 54, Issue 9, pp. S568 - S569
    3. Effect of glucosamine combined with omega-3 fatty acids on the development of canine experimental osteoarthritis by Frost-Christensen, LN; Lafeber, FPJG; Garssen, J; Hartog, A; Hazewinkel, HAW; Mastbergen, SC. ANNALS OF THE RHEUMATIC DISEASES, ISSN 0003-4967, 07/2006, Volume 65, p. 120 
  • My 1 1/2 yr. old male cat was just diagnosed with struvite crystals. He had a urine blockage last Thursday. He is now on Hills s/d for the next month then switch over to c/d.(per vet) I also have his male littermate. Is it genetic? Do I need to worry about the brother developing struvite crystals? I have been feeding both of them Fancy Feast Classic - chicken every morning and a different seafood classic at night. They also got Natural Choice Adult White Fish and Whole Brown Rice Formula (dry food). Is it safe to give the brother fish- whether is is in wet or dry form? Or does fish throw off the urine PH? I picked up the wrong bag the last time. I have been using the chicken and brown rice formula since they were a year old..
  • We do not know the genetic relationship well enough to state that the brother is at risk.  My impression of the diseases is that it is not of genetic origin. The ingredients in the diet are not relevant because in any diet the level of magnesium, phosphorous and urine pH controlled. Feeding s/d and then c/d is appropriate for any cat that has had a FLUTD-struvite blockage. Your second cat can eat the c/d as well in order to make feeding two cats in the same household easier.  If you wish to feed the second cat an OTC food, then you should look for the claim "promotes urinary tract health" which indicates the diet has undergone urine pH testing and did produce an acidotic pH and does contain a lower level of magnesium.
  • Our three-year-old pug has been having anal gland problems, and our vet speculates that it could be caused by food allergies. The vet recommended we try Purina HA hypoallergenic dog food to see if that resolves the problem. Presumably, if it does, we would keep our dog on it. Our dog seems to like the food (we are still transitioning gradually from the other food). My question concerns the fact that Purina HA contains partially hydrogenated canola oil. I know that partially hydrogenated oils are not considered safe for humans. Is it a problem that this dog food contains it? Thank you.
  • Good question! It does contain partially hydrogenated canola oil; however to the best of my knowledge, we have no evidence in dogs that trans fat are harmful as in people. I suggest you call the Purina 800 number on the bag and get their take on it - that is what the 800 number is for - so go for it!
  • I have a client with a dog that has probable osteoarthtitis based on physical exam (owner doesnt want to x-ray the dog) as well as possible dietary allergies (atopy and food - again based on history and exam). She is quite certain her dog is allergic to fish (general-not able to provide a certain type) and wool. I would like to place this dog on omega fatty acid supplementation however the owner doesn't want to try any fish based oils. Do you have any experience or had any success with supplementation with any non-fish based omega sources?
  • EPA and DHA come from fish so you are stuck there. You could try the BalanceIT.com, click on shop for products, and see DHA supplement which is from algae. I have not tried or used this product but I do trust the source and company.
  • Hi and thanks ahead for your help, I have an 18 yo female kitty who has kidney disease with following numbers: creatinine 2.6 and BUN 51.
    I understand there is the high quality protein vs low protein debate and am torn between giving her a normal high quality raw food mix such as RAD cat raw product with high quality protein and added nutrients vs Hills K/D diet which from my research is a lower quality lower protein value. Thanks ahead for your advice.
  • The debate is not well explained on public web site b/c most people do not understand the issue. In general: protein amount can be lower as the protein QUALITY (which is rated based on the amino acid profile, not the source) increases. In fact the cat does not have a protein requirement (as most folks believe) but has an requirement for nitrogen (which does come from protein) and a very particular amino acid. So if the kidney has decreased function for removing nitrogen waste then the total amount of excess nitrogen (from protein ) should be lowered but never below the animal's actual requirement. The biggest source of confusion to folks reading the lay or popular press verbiage on dietary management of renal disease is the use of "high" vs. "low" and they do not know the reference range or starting point relative to what is considered "high" or "low". And then if you use a high quality protein, the cat needs less of it to meet it's nitrogen and amino acid requirments with less excess nitrogen to filter out. If you feed a low quality protein, a higher total amount is needed to meet the essential amino acid requirements, but you will have excess nitrotgen to filter and blood BUN will rise. If you were to look into the essential amino acid profile of k/d or the protein sources in k/d and compare them to the cat's requirement, you should actually be impressed with the quality and utility of the diet to met but not exceed the nirogen and amino acid needs of most cats. The amouint needed but be deterined for each pateint because not all renal disease is the same in cats (some retain and some lose), and the disease progresses, so monitoring is key.The debate is not done well on public web site b/c most people do not understand the issue. In general: protein amount can be lower as the protein QUALITY (which is rated based on the amino acid profile, not the source of the protein) increases.
     
    In fact the cat does not have a protein requirement (as most folks go on and on about) but has a requirement for nitrogen (which does come from protein) and a very particular essential amino acid profile. So if the kidney has decreased function for removing nitrogen waste then the total amount of excess nitrogen (from protein) should be lowered but never below the animal's actual requirement. The biggest source of confusion to folks reading the lay or popular press verbiage on dietary management of renal disease is the use of "high" vs. "low" and they do not know the reference range or starting point relative to what is then considered "high" or "low".  If you use a high quality protein, the cat needs less of total nitrogen to meet its amino acid requirements, so with less excess nitrogen has to be filtered out. If you feed a low quality protein, a higher total amount is needed to meet the essential amino acid requirements, but you will have excess nitrogen to filter and blood BUN will rise.
     
    If you were to look into the essential amino acid profile of k/d or the protein sources in k/d and other feline renal diets and compare them to the cat's requirement, you should actually be impressed with the quality and utility of the diet to meet but not exceed the nitrogen and amino acid needs of most cats. The amount needed must be determined for each patient because not all renal disease is the same in cats (some retain and some lose protein), and the disease progresses, so monitoring is key.  Per usual, it is much more complicated and more difficult to do well, than most arm-chair nutritionist have decided to simplify upon when given a public venue such as a web site, chat, blog or twits.
  • I have a pit mix that seems to have allergies, I feed him reg. science diet. I have worked for a vet that does not believe he has a food allergy. He also has gotten a few steroid shots that seem to clear him up and then it comes back. I was wondering, what you recommend, and if I still should be feeding science diet or switch him to something else. He doesn't seemed bothered by it, but he always seems to have a yeasty smell to him and have to often bath him. I don't know what to do with him or where to begin. I would appreciate any recommendations you may have. Thank you
  • I would suggest a 12 wk food trial using a veterinary therapeutic diet (exclusively) with a novel protein to this dog.  If the dog gets better then you have some evidence for a food protein allergy and then know what foods to feed. If the dog does not get better in 12 wks, then a food protein is not causing the problems. You must go the full 12 wks for a skin problem before making a decision about the success of the new food.
  • I recently bought a GSD puppy - he is now almost 5 months old. The breeder discourages the use of "puppy" stage foods, saying they promote growth at a rate that is too fast. She recommended feeding "all life stages" Canidae. It has been years since I had my last puppy, but I do know that puppy foods are developed with the needs of a growing puppy in mind, so I decided to do a 50/50 mix of Purina ProPlan Puppy food and Canidae Chicken & Rice for all life stages. Do you think this is sufficient for my puppy, or should I be feeding him only puppy food? The breeder also recommended supplementing Vitamin C - is this necessary or even beneficial? I also used to supplement all my adult large dogs with Dasuquin with MSM. Would you recommend continuing this and, if so, at what age should I start the puppy on the Dasuquin? Thank you!
  • Sounds like the Breeder is not clear on AAFCO statements. A food with an "all lifestage" claim is in fact designed for puppies ...... However, her logic is correct about the growth rate but flawed in that Large Breed Puppy foods or Large breed Growth products are designed to achieve a slower growth rate when feed according to instructions.  Vit C is a very old myth ... it will not make any difference to the orthopedic health of your pup but you can feed it as it usually causes not harm.  Yes I would agree with feeding GSD Dasuquin with MSM there is very good data on that being a positive.
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